Dilys Roe's blog posts

27 November 2017 |

This week conservation policymakers from across the globe will meet in Geneva to discuss international wildlife trade. One item on the agenda is the role of local people – particularly those who live alongside wildlife – in making decisions about such issues.

27 October 2017 |

Bwindi Impenetrable National Park is a magnet for tourists wanting to see gorillas in the wild, but surrounding communities don't get much revenue from the tourist trade. Dilys Roe describes a project that is helping local people who live close to the edge of the forest to develop products and activities that will attract visitors – and much-needed income.

22 May 2017 |

Tourism generates crucial revenue that helps conserve mountain gorillas and other species in Uganda. We're working to share the financial benefits with local people too, and help them develop better tourism products and services.

11 April 2016 |

Cecil the Lion's legacy now extends to princes and politicians, but shouldn't the poor also have a say?

1 August 2014 |

A new project will explore the different reasons people commit wildlife crimes and suggest ways governments can respond without harming the poorest communities.

31 March 2014 |

There is an explicit assumption in international policy statements that conserving biodiversity can help in efforts to tackle global poverty.

3 March 2014 |

Ensuring local communities benefit from wildlife is key to successful conservation in the long term and can also help to fight the illegal wildlife trade. Share your community success stories with us on World Wildlife Day.

22 May 2013 |

With International Day for Biological Diversity on 22 May, a new biodiversity project highlights the importance of diversity and draws out tensions that arise when trying to put biodiversity at the centre of development policies.

Dilys Roe's blog posts with other authors

Francesca Booker and Dilys Roe
20 January 2017 |

Local communities are the first line of defence in tackling the illegal wildlife trade. But there's little information on initiatives involving local people. IIED's new database aims to gather more evidence on approaches that work, those that don't – and why.