Events

Webinar

Webinar: Gender inequalities in social protection – people, households and climate adaptation

Date: 2 April 2020
Where: Online
Three people gather around a wooden table on which papers are stacked

Cash transfer payments in Freetown, Sierra Leone, 2015 (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World Bank via FlickrCC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

IIED hosted an online discussion on the role of social protection schemes and how they can incorporate climate-resilience objectives and respond to the different needs of women and men.

Climate risks place a heavy burden on many households in developing countries, with basic needs such as food, water and shelter threatened. Some people and households finance adaptative measures by using savings and capitalising assets, taking loans from banks and private lenders, while others might receive support from social protection schemes.

This event on 2 April 2020 explored the role of social protection schemes and how they can incorporate climate-resilience objectives and respond to the different needs of women and men.

Women and men in developing countries face diverse challenges in their responses to the impacts of a changing climate. Not only do they need short-term coping mechanisms, but in the long term, they must adapt to a new way of life. For households this may mean more expensive seeds, food, machinery or travel to a different place for work.

As not all households are the same, we cannot assume that dual-headed households bear a similar burden to those headed only by women, or that within a household, women and men’s challenges are alike.

This event explored how these households respond to climate risks. What strategies do women and men deploy, and at what cost? Where there are social protection schemes, are climate-resilience objectives accounted for?

Contact

Juliette Tunstall (juliette.tunstall@iied.org), internal engagement and external events officer, IIED's Communications Group

Share and have your say: