Events

Webinar

Land, investment and migration: a portrait of village life in Mali

Date: Wednesday, 17 June 2020
Where: Online
Two women draw water from a well

Early morning in Dlonguebougou, Mali, in December 2010 and two young women draw water from a well (Photo: Camilla Toulmin, IIED)

The effects of the climate crisis, new technologies, and land grabs have altered the livelihoods and prospects of villagers living in Central Mali. IIED hosted an online event on Wednesday, 17 June to discuss how people survive and thrive in the uncertain and risk-prone Sahel, through the findings of a long-term study on the village of Dlonguebougou.

In the last 35 years Dlonguebougou, a rural community in the drylands of central Mali, has experienced significant social, economic and environmental change. The effects of the climate crisis, new technologies, and land grabs have altered the fortunes of individuals and families living in the community, prompting new investments for some and migration to town for others.

Camilla Toulmin has studied long-term change in the Malian Sahel since the early 1980s, examining the transformations to land use, people, and livelihoods in Dlonguebougou. Toulmin’s book Land, Investment, and Migration, Thirty-five Years of Village Life in Mali brings together her findings to tell the story of a changing community.

This event on Wednesday, 17 June 2020, the UN World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought, explored the findings from this study and reflect on the drivers of change.

Contact

Juliette Tunstall (juliette.tunstall@iied.org), internal engagement and external events officer

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