All projects and articles

A beekeeper in Guatemala finds an alternative source of income. Photo: Todd Post/Bread for the World Institute

Project

Do alternative livelihoods projects work to protect, maintain or even improve biodiversity? What has worked, what hasn’t worked and why? This project aims to answer some of those questions by analysing the evidence.
Ladeh Panjang Wetlands. Photo: Luke Mackin

Project

There is an explicit assumption that reducing the rate of biodiversity loss can help in efforts to tackle global poverty. But the evidence for this assumption is surprisingly weak. This project aims to review the existing evidence base, identify knowledge gaps and make evidence more widely available.
Field devoured by wild boar. Photo: Lhab Tshering\National Biodiversity Centre of Bhutan

Article

The links between biodiversity conservation and poverty alleviation are widely debated and hotly contested. We are carrying out research to clarify and assess the evidence on the links between the two.
Two oryx bound away across grasslands in Namibia.

Article

Biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction must be tackled together by the institutions that drive policy, rules, plans, investment and action for both – a process known as ‘mainstreaming’. We aim to ensure this happens through research, capacity building and partnerships with key organisations, communities and other actors.
Biodiversity illustration

Article

IIED’s work on biodiversity dates back over 25 years – although it has not always been labelled as such.
Great ape. Photo: Noodlefish

Project

Great Ape conservation organisations are increasingly aware of the need to address poverty if they are to be successful in their efforts to conserve habitats and protect dwindling Great Ape populations.
A Batwa man sits with his hands cupping his head

Project

This collaborative initiative with a consortium of international conservation organisations was formalised in 2009 to improve conservation work by promoting the integration of human rights principles into conservation policy and practice
Project partners share their experiences during a global learning network meeting in Uganda. Photo: Bill Vorley

Project

IIED is supporting and raising the profile of local organisations in East Africa to help make the case for investing in and scaling-up community-based approaches to transforming landscapes, economies and rural societies.
Protected area guards encounter a pelican. Photo: UNDP

Project

Understanding the trade-offs between conservation and poverty alleviation objectives has been slow. IIED is coordinating a project that aims to develop, test and roll out a methodology for rapidly assessing the social impacts of protected areas.
Tracking Gorillas in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda. Photo: YouTuT

Project

Despite recent interventions aimed at improving the livelihoods of communities in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park in Uganda, the illegal use of the park’s resources continues. This IIED project aims to better understand who is carrying out the unauthorised use of resources and why, so that interventions can be more effective in the future.
The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group (PCLG)

Project

The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is an international network of more than 100 conservation and development organisations that promotes learning on the linkages between biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction, in order to improve policy and practice. Individuals with an interest in poverty-conservation issues are also welcome to join the group to take advantage of the resources we offer, and to contribute to our work.
Members of a Indian women’s group in a field of Finger Millet. Photo: Bioversity International.

Project

IIED aims to change the way that conservation is implemented so that it conserves biodiversity and helps poor people improve their lives. We do this through facilitating dialogue, conducting and supporting research, and engaging in training and advocacy.
Researchers in the field. Photo: CGIAR

Project

It is a huge challenge to achieve food security for all in a way that is sustainable environmentally, economically, socially and politically.
Drying medicinal plants, the knowledge of which is passed down through generations. In South Asia alone, there are more than 8,000 plant species with known medicinal value.Photo: Bioversity International/B. Sthapit

Project

How and under what conditions can decentralised governance, capacity building and participation by farmers promote food systems that adapt to changing conditions and climates and maintain agricultural biodiversity?
Agricultural biodiversity in a Peruvian market. Photo: Bioversity International/A. Camacho

Project

IIED strengthens the capacity of local organisations and institutions by designing resilient food systems and sustaining local food systems.
People from a village in Mali listen to a man providing legal literacy training to raise their awareness on the law and land rights. Photo: Lorenzo Cotula.

Article

Taken together, national laws, international treaties and transnational contracts define the terms of an investment and the distribution of its risks, costs and benefits. Getting the law and contracts right is a critical part of ensuring that an investment contributes to sustainable development.
A community in the Philippines protesting against a mining project in their area holds up their resolutions against the plans, developed through the support of paralegals who provided them with legal advice.

Article

Investors are increasingly interested in accessing land and natural resources in some of the world’s poorest countries. While this can create new opportunities for local communities, it also comes with risks. These new pressures on land require communities to develop new resources and capabilities to make decisions on the potential risks and benefits of engaging with investors and to block plans if they’re not in their best interest.
Mechanised farming in Tanzania. Land purchases by foreign investment companies for agribusinesses are pushing farmers off their land. Using legal rights effectively can help local people get a better deal for themselves and their communities. Photo: Africa renewal

Project

Can a half-acre of dry earth be more precious than gold? To farmers in some of the world's poorest countries, the answer is very literally yes. Goldmining, agribusiness and other interests are pushing farmers off the land they need for crops, and polluting their waterways.
 red bananas - creative commons

Article

The Regoverning Markets project focused on how the modernisation of agrifood markets in emerging economies, and implications for small-scale producers. The goal was to secure more equitable producer and trade benefits in response to those changes. It was a multi-partner collaborative research programme made up of a consortium of some 20 research organisations and funding agencies.

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