Blogs

Downtown Dar es Salaam: the largest city in Tanzania is on track to have a population over 50 million (Photo: Babak Fakhamzadeh, Creative Commons, via Flickr)
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Population predictions for the world's largest cities in the 21st century (part 2): New figures show the population of the world's largest cities set to soar. This rapid growth calls for better, more sustainable cities
Old Indonesia coins. In Indonesia, like the UK, the income of the poorest 40 per cent has to grow at twice the rate of the national average if the income gap is to stay the same (Photo: Anis Eka, Creative Commons, via Flickr)
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The international commitment to reducing inequality marks a welcome breakthrough. But without clearer targets for measuring progress, driving change to tackle rising inequality will be a challenge
Lillies spread over a pond; cities must be governed and managed well to ensure population growth is sustainable (Photo: hqworld)
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Population predictions for the world's largest cities in the 21st century (part 1): rapid urbanisation, if managed sustainably, could ease the pressure of exponential growth set for urban areas
A young rice farmer at Sélingué, Mali. A new report urges governments and development agencies to develop context-specific strategies and support systems for agricultural advisory services that meet the needs of local farmers (Photo: Mike Goldwater)
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Research in West Africa finds that smallholder farmers are not benefiting enough from investments in irrigation because they are not getting access to the agriculture services they need
A pastoralist dwelling in Niger. Rural communities have learned to exploit the variability of dryland environments (Photo: IIED)
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Droughts in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel introduced the idea of desertification to a worldwide audience. However it can be argued that the concept of desertification has ceased to be analytically useful and distorts our understanding of social-environmental systems and their resilience. For better policy and governance, we need to reconsider the scientific justification for attempts to manage drylands by combating desertification
Village councils or panchayats have not been involved in India's approach to the SDGs so far (Photo: UN Women Asia and the Pacific)
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Although India has taken some important steps to implement the Sustainable Development Goals, there is still not enough participation in developing plans and not enough information has reached citizens
Dharavi slum, Mumbai, India (Photo: Akshay Mahajan, Creative Commons via Flickr)
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Global goals and targets often rely on national data, but local data are needed to inform action on the ground and to monitor progress on the goals
Workers at the Dakete Gold Mine explain health and safety procedures in a powdering station. The IIED dialogue aimed to engage key stakeholders, including mineworkers, in a conversation about the future of ASM mining in Ghana (Photo: Friends of the Nation)
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A dialogue in Ghana presented a unique opportunity to bring stakeholders together and find solutions to realise the potential of small-scale mining
San Isidro Ketchi Cuisine and Craft Restaurant (SIKCCR - San Isidro) worked on their business plan (Photo: Duncan Macqueen)
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IIED and partners are providing business training to community groups hoping to set up forest-farm enterprises in the pine woodlands of southern Belize. The project aims to promote conservation, community-based fire risk management and just and sustainable use of woodland resources
A pastoralist with camels in Niger. Pastoralists use resources flexibly and adapt to climate variability more easily than many other groups. State policies that favour settled agriculture are more of a challenge (Photo: Stephen Andersen/IIED)
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The Sahel is often recognised as a hotspot of violent conflict. As climate change becomes a leading global political issue, an emerging and increasingly powerful policy narrative presents global warming as a major driver. But how valid is this argument?

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